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Hiking Guide

WTA's hiking guide is the most comprehensive database of hikes in Washington, and comprises content written by local hiking experts and user submitted information. All data is vetted by WTA staff. This resource is made possible by the donations of WTA members.

We respectfully acknowledge the lands we are visiting are the homelands of Indigenous tribes of the Pacific Northwest, some of whom have reserved treaty rights on these lands. Tribes continue to rely on and share in the management of these lands today. Please tread gently and treat these places with respect.

Results List

3 Hikes
Columbia Hills State Park - Stacker Butte

Southwest Washington -- Columbia River Gorge - WA

 
5.0 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 1150 ft.
Highest Point: 3200.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.00
(1 vote)
If your car can take the chassis-rattling drive to the Stacker Butte trailhead, you'll be rewarded with one of the most gratifying views-per-mile hikes in Washington. The Columbia Hills Natural Area Preserve boasts spreading views of the east side of the Columbia River Gorge, both in Washington and Oregon, and provides one of the only protected areas for houndstongue hawkweed and Idaho fescue grasslands. These protected plants need mininmal disturbance, so it's especially important to stay on trail and four-legged hiking companions have to stay home from this hike.
 
 
Columbia Hills State Park - Crawford Oaks

Southwest Washington -- Columbia River Gorge - WA

 
4.0 miles, roundtrip
Rating:
Average rating:
4.00
(1 vote)
This trail in Columbia Hills is one of three excellent destinations in this location. Do an out-and-back, or a loop hike! Visit in winter for great views of the Columbia River and Mount Hood, or in spring for a stunning wildflower show.
 
 
Columbia Hills State Park - Horsethief Butte

Southwest Washington -- Columbia River Gorge - WA

 
1.2 miles, roundtrip
Gain: 200 ft.
Highest Point: 498.0 ft.
Rating:
Average rating:
3.67
(6 votes)
Horsethief Butte, one part of the expansive Columbia Hills State Historical Park, is composed of hexagonal columns of Wanapum basalt flows that were scoured by the Ice Age floods some 10,000 years ago. Rock climbers are attracted to the sheer cliff faces but hikers and scramblers will find a marked route to the summit.