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Hiker Headlines: Gear Libraries, Lyle Cherry Reopening, Wolverines, Community Science

Posted by Rachel Wendling at Aug 26, 2021 10:33 AM |

WTA is excited to open our second gear library in Puget Sound. Lyle Cherry Orchard trails are once again open to hikers. Wildfire season isn't over yet — but we can help you plan around it. Wolverines are making a comeback in the Cascades. And, our local pikas could use your help. Here’s some news you may have missed while out on trail this week.

It’s August 26. WTA is excited to open our second gear library in Puget Sound. Lyle Cherry Orchard trails are once again open to hikers. Wildfire season isn't over yet — but we can help you plan around it. Wolverines are making a comeback in the Cascades. And, our local pikas could use your help. Here’s some news you may have missed while out on trail this week.

A pike on a talus field in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest.
A pika looks over a rock in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. Photo by Madeline Miscavage.

We're growing! WTA is excited to announce the opening of a second gear library at Meridian Habitat Park in Puyallup. As a part of our Outdoor Leadership Training program, these libraries help us empower and equip educators and community leaders to get youth outdoors. We are thrilled to be able to better support our existing partners in the south Puget Sound region and create opportunities to build new relationships with more communities.

Lyle Cherry reopening: Great news for Gorge-area hikers! The trails at Lyle Cherry Orchard have reopened after closing for several weeks due to fire activity. Hikers can now enjoy the work of WTA volunteers as they visit the newly created Lyle Loop.

Adventuring in wildfire season: WTA, along with other local trail experts, shared tips for hike planning during wildfire season over at Outside Online. Our number one recommendation? Know where not to go.

Return of the wolverine: This summer, a second litter of wolverine offspring (kits) was spotted in Mount Rainier National Park. This marks the third wolverine family documented in Washington’s South Cascades in a century, and is a great sign for the recolonization of this native species. 

Protecting pikas: Biologists with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife could use your help collecting data on pika presence along local trails. The next time you head out on a mountainous trail with rocky talus slopes, keep an eye (and ear) out for these fuzzy fellas and make a note of where you saw them. You can easily report your sighting via their app — audio recording and photos are encouraged! 


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