Trails for everyone, forever

Home News Blog Saving Lost Trails, One Step at a Time

Saving Lost Trails, One Step at a Time

Posted by Rachel Wendling at Nov 06, 2017 12:03 PM |
Filed under:

In 2015, WTA launched our Lost Trails Found campaign, with the goal of restoring trails that are slowly but surely disappearing. Key trails were identified and WTA marched onward with the ambitious goal of rehabilitating at least three lost trails by 2020.

Overgrown brush, washed out trails, collapsed bridges, downed trees, impassable road conditions … all of these qualities (and more!) can be ascribed to a trail on the verge of being lost.

Middle Fork Pasayten YVV Isabel Shinnick-Gordon.JPG
Participants on the Middle Fork Pasayten youth volunteer vacation pose with trail tools atop their newly constructed turnpike. Photo by Isabel Shinnick-Gordon.

In 2015, WTA launched our Lost Trails Found campaign, with the goal of restoring trails that are slowly but surely disappearing. Key trails were identified and WTA marched onward with the ambitious goal of rehabilitating at least three lost trails by 2020. The restoration of these lost trails will make them more accessible to Washington’s ever-growing hiking population and potentially relieve some of the pressure on other popular trails.

2017 was a busy year for WTA’s work on lost trails, especially in the Pasayten Wilderness and the Goat Rocks Wilderness, two areas that WTA identified as priority regions. Day work party crews, volunteer vacation crews (both youth and adult) and backcountry response teams were sent to the field to carry out WTA’s vision of bringing trails like Angry Mountain, West Fork Methow and Klickitat back from the brink. Projects included log-outs of hundreds of downed trees, turnpike construction, tread work, reroutes and brushing. WTA expects to continue sending crews out to these areas in the years to come.

In addition to making headway in the Pasayten and the Goat Rocks, WTA is working with the U.S. Forest Service as it formulates next steps for the funding and installation of a new bridge on the Milk Creek Trail, which has not been maintained since the old bridge was washed out by a flood in 2003.

For additional updates on our work on these lost trails, visit wta.org/losttrails.

Comments